Monday, July 30, 2012

I Talk Gud


Robyn revealed to me a few weeks ago that I've been mispronouncing the word vo-cab-u-lary as VOL-cabulary for as far back as I remember. Possibly in the context of "my VOLcabulary is so big". Ughh.
 
Also, that one episode of the Simpsons where Homer says, "It's pronounced nuke-u-lar" has pretty much ruined the word for me, forever. This wouldn't be so bad if Robyn didn't work in the uranium industry. Now I saw "nu-" then pause and strain to remember what comes next.
 
Damn it.
 
(this reminded me of a funny story - I had a culinarily unadventurous friend in high school who would order chicken tenders at every restaurant. We'd gently tease him by asking the waitress, "What's this on the menu... can you tell me about your Chike-an Ten-dears?" Okay, maybe you had to be there)

Friday, July 27, 2012

Not Going Back to Non-Stick!


I recently posted about my roommate moving out, and how living alone kind of sucks.

One think that's FUN about roommates moving out is that both parties have to stock up on formerly-shared housewares. Actually, I guess this is only fun if you're financially able to stock up on housewares and you secretly love buying housewares. Hmm.

Anyway, I love housewares. In our apartment, I owned most of the pots, but my roommate owned most of the pans. Most of his pans had a Teflon non-stick coating, with the exception of one gigantic, brilliant, stainless steek wok.

After using that stainless steel wok, I am never going back to Teflon again.

My main beef with Teflon (and any other off-brand non-stick coatings) is not the remote health risks to humans and birds, rather, it's the fact that the coating is not permanent!! From pots to pans to George Foreman grills, everything with a Teflon coating is basically a ticking garbage time bomb waiting to find its way to the dump. My secondary beef with Teflon is that you have to worry about what utensils you use to stir and scrape, or risk accelerating the garbage time bomb.

It doesn't make sense to continue buying $30 Teflon-coated frying pans every 2-5 years. So when my roommate took his magnificent stainless wok away (along with his average Teflon pans) I bought two stainless frying pans and a wok from Home Outfitters for $170.

I'm not trying to say, "Ooooh, look at me, look at all the money I'm spending on pans." I'm just re-learning the same lesson I have to re-learn every few years: buy good quality and it will last a lifetime (see other post about my hunt for the perfect messenger bag). Good quality doesn't have to be TOO expensive. I spotted some pots and pans that cost upwards of $250 apiece - probably because it costs a lot of money to print Jamie Oliver's face on the packaging.

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Roomies


My roommate moved out of my/our apartment last weekend. We shared the unit for about 40 months, although my primary residence was in Montreal for 12 of those months.
 
I think lots of people have roommates solely for financial reasons; someone to help pay the rent. I was pretty lucky that my roommate was a close friend. He was also about the same level of cleanliness and a non-crazypants. My sister once rented an apartment with a friend of hers, but the roommate relationship deteriorated quickly and they had to break our of their lease within 6 months of signing it. Having some common ground with a roommate makes a big difference. It's been fun coming home, making a quick supper then chillaxing with a beer over a Blue Jays game or a few episodes of Metalocalypse.
 
I love some aspects of living alone - organizing things however you want, postponing dishes as long as you want - but I miss the reliable human interaction already. Despite the benefits, I'm just not a fan of inhabiting a space by myself.  
 
I can survive alone just fine (as I did in Montreal) and Robyn will be moving in soon enough (yay!). I am looking forward to that. A significant other trumps a roommate in the sense that everything is "ours". There are still personal boundaries, but there is no "my room" and "your room", or no "my carton of eggs" and "your carton of eggs".
 
Of course, I hope we don't stay in the McPherson apartment for too long. It's just... crummy.

Monday, July 23, 2012

What's New?


I haven't posted a blog entry for a long time.

I am busy working 50 hours a week (plus carpool time), so weekdays are tiring. My weekday evenings consist of eating supper, maybe seeing Robyn for a bit, watching an hour of TV then going to bed.

But work is interesting. Just last week we connected a 138,000 volt overhead line from SaskPower to a giant gas-insulated switchgear which feeds two brand-new transformers on our project site. The transformers transform the 138,000 volts into a more manageable 13,800 volts. After that, another pair of transformers step the voltage down to about 5,000 volts. For reference, your house outlets are 120 volts (your washer/dryer/dishwasher/oven might be 240 V).

This is our GIS.

What is a gas-insulated switchgear (GIS), though? The answer is interesting. Have you ever noticed a spark when you plug in an electrical appliance into a socket? You've just seen a tiny little electrical arc that bridges or "jumps" the air gap between two metal conductors. If you've been to a science centre and have seen a Jacob's Ladder or a Tesla coil, you've seen another kind of electrical arc. When you are playing with 138,000 volts, you don't get tiny fun arcs. You get humongous monster electrical arcs that can cause serious damage, injury or death due to burns or explosions. They can last for fractions of a second or several seconds.

Anytime you want to unplug from something that's providing 138,000 volts, you have to do it safely to minimize exposure to electrical arcs. One way to do this is to encapsulate the whole on/off switch (called a "disconnect") in an airtight, cast-aluminum enclosure and fill it with sulfur-hexaflouride (SF6) gas, a gas which is much heavier than air and naturally quenches electrical arcs. Arcs still form in GIS units, but are blasted with a jet of SF6 to disrupt and terminate them within milliseconds of them forming.

Fact: If you inhale SF6 gas, it has the opposite effect as helium gas - it lowers your voice! No, I haven't tried it.

Another fact: If the GIS leaks, it could fill the GIS building with colourless, odorless SF6 gas. This is an asphyxiation hazard (because it displaces oxygen), so we installed an SF6 detector that screams if the levels get too high, and automatically starts an exhaust fan to vent the building and bring fresh air in. So far, no leaks.